Dear Anarkik3DDesigners….

A banner showing colourful 3D printed work and jewellery by Anarkik3DDesigners: Ursula, Genna, Birgit, Lizzie, Genna, Anne, Katja, Birgit, Anne, Ann Marie, Birgit, Anne and Ursula
3D printed work from left to right: Ursula, Genna, Birgit, Lizzie, Genna, Anne, Katja, Birgit, Anne, Ann Marie, Birgit, Anne and Ursula

Anarkik3D’s message to you,

We are so proud of your achievements using our 3D modelling programme. It gives us tremendous pleasure to see images of the stunning and beautiful 3D designs and 3D models you are creating, getting 3D printed and then made into very desirable objects. Anarkik3DDesigners, you are at the forefront regarding circular economy and sustainable manufacturing because using digital technologies is known to reduce carbon footprint significantly.

Okay, a circular economy ethos is not new to how we as applied artists and makers have always worked. Our inspiration and resilience stem from valuing our materials and the challenges we take on within our practice to reuse and reduce waste. Although our impact is miniscule compared to that of corporates, jointly we make a big difference.

By telling the stories behind the scene we can make an even greater impact especially as discerning people are prioritising eco-provenance when making purchasing decisions. ‘A recent Deloitte survey found that throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly half of consumers altered their activities or purchase behaviours to help address climate change.’* One narative then is that 3D printing ‘is recognised as a solution for achieving sustainable manufacturing’* because being an additive process the amount of materials used is minimised.

This image shows groups of types of work where Anarkik3DDesigners can benefit from 3D digital technical efficiencies by using small batch production, customisation, just in time and on-demand production to reduce inventory and inevitable wastage.
3D printing, prototyping, choosing eco-friendly materials

With thoughtful use of digital technologies to prototype our models in a risk-free waste-free environment and by designing for 3D printing we can create efficiencies through small batch production, customisation, just in time and on-demand production to reduce inventory and inevitable wastage.

As makers we can reduce our carbon footprint further by searching out 3D print service companies that use eco materials and request these. For those of us that have, or can access desktop 3D printers we can choose to use eco-friendly filaments. Ann Marie Shillito (an Anarkik3DDesigner too) and Dr Allison Macleod are two jewellers who are members of Applied Arts Scotland which supports, in partnership with Creative Informatics, their group project ‘Closing the Loop’. The project is investigating and exploring gaps in current materials knowledge and application of sustainability tools and practices in the studio.

This banner shows an Ultimaker2 Desktop 3D printer, reels of eco-friendly filament and printing trials to achieve a quality print using filament with a high percent of recycled materials to virgin polymers.
Desktop 3D printer and the trials to achieve a quality print using filament with a high percent of recycled materials to virgin polymers.

As part of our mission Ann Marie and Allison are hosting an online meet-up with guest speakers to discuss with other applied artists and makers, engaged with, or interested in 3D printing, how we go about reducing our carbon footprint, recycling waste, cutting down on waste, and questioning logistical issues.

This free online meet-up is on 22nd June at 6 pm UK time. Want to know more on this topic? You are very welcome to join us and the link to register is below**

Professor Sam Vittese, a Maker, Lecturer and Reader in Applied Art and Design at Edinburgh Napier University is a guest speaker. One of her projects is about using waste fibres combined with PLA plastic to create a new mixed material for 3D printing and laser cutting, and the potential applications.

The three of us use desktop 3D printers to produce our work. Allison’s topic is ‘3D printing in the studio’ and Ann Marie’s is ‘Using a desktop 3D printer for experimenting’.

The image shows the Ultimaker2 3D printer being use for experimental purposed. Here it is 3D printing red filament through and onto deadstock silk fabric, an experimment by Anarkik3DDesigner, Ann Marie Shillito

Using an Ultimaker 3D printer to explore 3D printing onto fabric

We will have a recorded presentation from Ravi Toor from Filamentive about producing filaments with a high percentage of recycled polymers. Recycling plastics, that would otherwise end up in landfill, to produce eco-friendly materials, is important for industry and for customers to have green alternatives. So we are hoping to have a fourth guest speaker from a 3D print service company that uses Filamentive’s products to add this other perspective.

We look forward to hearing your perspective too on this topic.

*https://www.fabbaloo.com/news/3d-printing-is-pivotal-to-sustainable-manufacturing-and-the-circular-economy

** https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/sustainable-3d-printing-for-applied-artists-tickets-355186972797

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